What are the different areas of investment banking?

What are the different areas of banking?

Corporate Banking

  • Loans and other credit products.
  • Treasury and cash management services.
  • Equipment lending.
  • Commercial real estate.
  • Trade finance.
  • Employer services.

What is an investment banker do?

Investment banks provide a variety of financial services to individuals, corporations, and government entities. They essentially act as financial advisors, assisting their clients with stock and bond offerings, as well as mergers and acquisitions.

How many investment banks are there?

Furthermore, there are over 2,000 Boutique investment banks globally, compared to roughly 10 Bulge Bracket investment banks. Statistically you have a much better chance of landing a job at a Boutique investment bank than at a Bulge Bracket bank because there are so many more potential employers.

What are the 4 areas of finance?

The four main areas of finance are corporate finance, investments, financial institutions and markets, and international finance.

What should I study for investment banking?

Other courses suitable for the investment banking industry are:

  • Bachelor of Commerce (B.Com) Hons.
  • Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Finance/Economics.
  • Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) in Finance.
  • Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) Programme.

What degree is investment banking?

Most investment banks prefer degrees in finance, accounting, business administration, and other business disciplines. Undergraduate degree subjects are less influential in the hiring process if a candidate has a master’s degree in business administration, finance, or another highly relevant subject.

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What skills are required to be an investment banker?

Ability to work in a fast-paced, team-based environment with minimal supervision. Working knowledge of deal structuring and closing principals. Strong communication and networking skills. Impeccable research, quantitative and analytical skills, especially in explaining market events.